Solid and dreamy roots on Puma Ptah’s solo debut

PumaPtah_InOneAccord_02U.S. singer Puma Ptah – formerly Ras Puma – was born on the Virgin Islands, but moved to the mainland about ten years ago where he later joined eclectic DJ and artist collective Thievery Corporation. Last year he decided to pursue a solo career – even though he still works with the Corporation – and recently dropped his debut set.

In One Accord collects seven rootsy tracks; five vocal cuts and two dub versions mixed by I Grade’s Tippy I and Y & D Duke from Switzerland.

Puma Ptah makes solid and soothing roots reggae with live instrumentation and beautiful arrangements. His vocal style is calm and relaxed yet with a dramatic touch. He reflects on politics and spiritual issues and sings about unity and love for all mankind.

The percussion-driven Prudence is dreamy, Home comes with strings and a pulsating organ and Upright has bright horns and echo-laid vocals.

Certainly a solid debut from a promising singer.

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Catching the reggaemylitis with Lloyd Brown

lloyd-brown-from-the-old-schoolUK’s Lloyd Brown – one of the most consistent artist in the reggae industry – is no stranger to productiveness. He usually drops one album each year and sometimes two. And this is now the case.

On July 30 he dropped two albums – From the Old School and Twenty. And together they collect a whopping 32 tracks; 16 on each set.

Both albums have telling titles. From the Old School – with a sleeve influenced by The Harder They Come – carries vintage vibes with several relicks and influences from rocksteady and reggae from the early 70s. Twenty is the name of his 20th album and has a slightly more contemporary approach.

They present timeless reggae of the finest calibre. It’s soulful, natural and bittersweet. The quality is impressively uniform; as always one might add.LloydBrown_01

Lloyd Brown is probably best known for his sweet and smooth relationship outings. And there are plenty of love and romance on both sets. His honeyed voice is custom-made for singing about lost love, relationship mistakes and heartfelt apologies.

These two albums are beautiful and clearly recorded and produced with love and affection.

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Laid-back vibes on Bobby Hustle’s debut album

UPC-682384058466-610x610The U.S. reggae scene has been growing in the last couple of years, partly thanks to the thriving VI reggae scene with trailblazers like Midnite. They have for example had a great impact on the conscious sounds coming from the West Coast.

Bobby Hustle is from Seattle and part of the West Coast – or Left Coast as he puts it – reggae scene. He has been around for quite a while now and recently dropped his soothing debut album It’s the Hustle. It’s an eleven track set full of uplifting vibes, ganja smoke and infectious melodies.

Bobby Hustle likes marijuana. The weed is celebrated on no less than three tracks. He sings that he needs it to calm down. And judging from his incredibly relaxed and silky smooth singing style he probably uses rizzlas and chalwas quite often.

You are drawn into this contemporary reggae album. And the pop melodies, laid-back vibes and catchy choruses stick like glue.

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Listen to Treesha

treesha-listenKenya-born and Germany-based singer Treesha started singing in school and in church. After moving to Germany she was discovered by Gentleman and joined his Evolution Band about three years ago. But while on tour she met talented singjay Skarra Mucci who believed in her talent and signed her on his own label.

One of her first singles as a solo singer was a cut on Oneness Records’ Retro Locks riddim, which dropped earlier this year. Her Don’t Do It is a slice of contemporary one drop showcasing a confident singer with great vocal capabilities.

Listen has a number of different producers involved – Oneness, DJ Denzen and Bazzazian – and collects 15 tracks offering mostly modern reggae, but also a few slices of R&B, ska and lightweight dancehall.

Treesha has a lush and sensual singing style and highlights include the urgent I’m a Lion, the catchy title track and the romancing Skarra Mucci combination Love You Like 123.

Nice when talented singers are able to move from the background to the spotlight.

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A fruitful meeting between France and the UK

untitledUK roots and dub champion Russ D has joined forces with France’s Idlers Corner Records on the joint effort Idlers Corner Records meets Russ D.

The set collect 15 cuts and leans heavily towards dub – ten tracks are dub versions. It’s rootsy and digital and features vocal talents from veteran Waterhouse specialists like Kirk Davis aka Little Kirk and Yami Bolo along with Avaran and Ras Attitude.

Russ D is dangerous every time he reaches the mixing board. He has been a disciple of reggae and dub since the mid-80s and has worked with high profile producers like Jah Shaka, Jah Tubby’s, Jah Warrior, Frenchie and Irie Ites along with several others.

A solid set with particularly deadly, yet very tasty, dub versions.

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Fresh and urban from Oriel

Dominican singer Oriel is productive. On July 2 he put out two EP’s. But that was however never the plan and the idea morphed after working with UK-based and Grammy-nominated producer Daniel Boyle.

Love SoulJah was slated for release and then Oriel teamed up with Daniel Boyle who remastered some of his previous releases, and they, together with a few new tracks, sum up Confidence 2.0.

The two EP’s are combined as one release on digital outlets, but they have a slightly different approach and sound. Love SoulJah is smoother and softer and deals with love and relationships, while Confidence 2.0 is deeper with a more social and political vibe.

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This combined set leans much toward pop music and it’s often easily accessible and catchy. Most cuts are however powered by brilliant bass lines. Check the country and western inspired Down Where I Live, the contemporary R&B flavoured Love SoulJah or album opener Confidence with its bulldozer bass line.

A fresh and urban set from an artist with great potential.

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Bright and uplifting on Rampalion’s Inside the Kete Heart

a0697029808_16Spanish reggae duo Rampalion returns with a second album, the follow-up to last year’s Songs ´Bout Love and Fight.

On Inside the Kete Heart Juan Manuel Villa Escribano and Oscar Montesinos Marques get additional musicians to add horns and backing vocals. Otherwise this album is mostly created by themselves.

The set revolves around percussion and several of the songs are based on percussion – the bass drum, the kete drum and the funde. All three instrumental in nyabinghi music. This album is however much more than a nyabinghi effort. It has the organic and pulsating flavour of a nyabinghi album, but it’s also more melodious and catchy. Partly thanks to grand harmonies and infectious, and insanely catchy, choruses and melodies. Listen to Meditation. It sticks like glue.

Lead singer Juan Manuel Villa Escribano has a raw and passionate voice and sometimes he could be mistaken for a rock singer. On Hope he certainly shows his range. It has an 80s vibe with its uplifting horns and memorable melody.

I have ever heard a reggae album based in the nyabinghi tradition that is as easy-going and accessible as Inside the Kete Heart.

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Solid and comfortable debut from Karl Morrison

karl-morrison-better-must-come-ep-starplayer-music-groupJamaican producer, musician, teacher, background vocalist and engineer Karl Morrison has been working successfully behind the scenes for many years. And if you Google his name you don’t get many hits. But he has been key architect behind several hits – Busy Signal’s One More Night and Nightshift, Junior Kelly’s Ease My Pain and Gyptian’s Mama Don’t Cry. He has also worked with Sean Paul, T.O.K, Ding Dong, John Holt and Ken Boothe.

Now he has decided to step into the spotlight as a singer. A year ago he started working on his debut album Better Must Come, and it dropped in May.

Karl Morrison is a classically trained pianist and he attended the acclaimed Edna Manley College of the Visual Arts. His skills can be heard throughout the album. He has a great sense for pop hooks and catchy melodies. Just listen to The Storm Will Be Over, the first track he recorded for this self-produced album. It’s warm, sophisticated and uplifting. Just as the rest of this stylish and mature debut effort that battles social issues and equality as well as celebrating the moral of the Jamaican people.

Karl Morrison’s soothing vocal style and pleasant tone is similar to Duane Stephenson and while the latter is now a household name in the business, the former will probably soon be a force to be reckoned with – both in the limelight and behind.

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Mafia & Fluxy and The Pharmacist treat pain, depression and anesthesia on new dub album

mafia-fluxy-introducing-the-pharmacist-feat-the-pharmacistFirst came Scientist, Peter Chemist and Mad Professor and now UK’s premier Mafia & Fluxy introduce another academic dub wiz – The Pharmacist. Who’s behind that alias is shrouded in mystery.

On Introducing The Pharmacist – produced by Mafia & Fluxy – this mysterious engineer has mixed 12 deadly cuts and some of them come with titles inspired by heavy drugs – Ketamine Dub, a medication used mainly for starting and maintaining anesthesia, Tramadol Dub, pain reliever used to treat moderate to severe pain, and Amitriptyline Dub, a drug to treat depression.

Some of the cuts on this lethal set come with extra all – sirens, laser beams, echo, reverb, delay and other audio effects that have been the preferred choice for dub engineers since the 70s. Other tracks are a bit more conservatively mixed with focus on the bare essentials – bass and drums.

They have rejuvenated several well-known riddims and the dub version of Johnny Clarke’s mighty Declaration of Rights sets the tone as album opener. It’s absolutely devastating with its haunting organ, Johnny Clarke’s echoing voice and rapid-fire percussion. It’s followed by yet another brilliant relick – Johnny Osbourne’s Truths and Rights, which comes with a hypnotic and spellbinding bass line powered by decades of ganja smoking.

If you need a more natural treatment for curing pain, anesthesia and depression check this album instead of going to the doctor.

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Joss Stone and Damian Marley make sweet reggae music

Joss-Stone-Water-For-Your-Soul-CoverA big voice. She has a big voice. I’m talking about soul singer Joss Stone. I haven’t heard much from her prior to listening to her new reggae-based album Water for Your Soul.

This 14 track set is a result of a collaboration with Damian Marley who Joss Stone worked with on his and Nas’ collaborative effort Distant Relatives, a set that at times isn’t far from a few of the cuts on Water for Your Soul. The two were also part of all-star super-group SuperHeavy together with Mick Jagger, Dave Stewart and A.R. Rahman.

Joss Stone is 28 years old. She has made music professionally for the past 12. This is her seventh studio album. That’s crazy impressive. Over the years she has tried and tested many genres. She started with R&B and has since moved effortlessly between soul, blues, funk and rock. Never stopping, always on the move.

So a reggae album isn’t really that surprising. But quite a few will probably laugh by just hearing Joss Stone and reggae in the same sentence. But they will be proven wrong. Because this album has it fair share of memorable moments, but also a bunch of less memorable ones, for example the ridiculous ganja anthem Sensimilla.

The album collects soulful, sensual and mostly lightweight reggae with a slices of funk, latin and hip-hop thrown in. The arrangements are superb with elastic and bubbling rhythms underpinning Joss Stone’s powerful vocals.

Joss Stone graces massive reggae cuts like Molly Town and Harry’s Symphony with confidence and swagger. The former borrowing from the massive Swing Easy riddim and on the latter she – together with Linton Kwesi Johnson – warns against bad boys. She also nods towards reggae singers Johnny Osbourne, Matthew McAnuff, Barrington Levy and a few others.

Water for Your Soul might be bubble-gum reggae, but it sure tastes good.

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