Tag Archives: Bost & Bim

Al Fingers reinvents music

“There are no rules in the world of mash-ups, the weirdest combinations can have the best results.” These words are from Al Fingers, a London-based musician, producer and DJ, who recently orchestrated the Greensleeves/Stüssy collaboration resulting in a book, a mixtape and t-shirt line.

Al Fingers has made blends using two decks since he was a kid – often for mixtapes, but sometimes to play out live in clubs and at parties. The first mash-up he put out was Marvin Gaye’s classic What’s Going On over the powerful Take A Ride rhythm, originally produced by Coxsone Dodd.

− At that time I was putting together a themed mixtape called Serious Times. All the tunes were about the state of the world – a musical attack on George Bush and his minions. I wanted to use Marvin’s What’s Going On and Johnny Osbourne’s Truth & Rights, because they both fit the theme. I had the Marvin acapella so I tried blending it with the Truths & Rights instrumental and it worked, writes Al Fingers in an e-mail to Reggaemani.

“Presenting the song in a new light”
He writes that a great mash-up is one that sounds natural, like the singer was really singing over that particular beat. But you need to be patient and put in a lot of time.

− I spend a lot of time tweaking the phrasing of the vocal, so that it sits on the beat in the right way. The main thing is that it needs to sound believable and not forced in any way, he writes and continues:

− At the same time, I think a good mash-up reinvents a tune, in a way that is unexpected, sometimes bringing out parts of the vocal that you may not have noticed in the original. A great mash-up needs to be musical but also interesting – presenting the song in a new light.

Interest in different kinds of music
According to Al Fingers, a great mash-up producer needs a good ear, but it also helps to have an interest in different kinds of music as the mix of genres can produce unexpected and interesting results. He also points out one thing that French producers Bost & Bim thirst for.

− Ideally, you also need a big selection of acapellas and instrumentals, and a lot of patience, because although some mash-ups can be put together in no time, others can take a lot of fine tuning.

Trial and error
In producing mash-ups, Al Fingers tries a lot of different combinations and develops the ones that sound promising. He always combines tunes that are already in the same key and doesn’t mess with the pitch too much, although sometimes uses a bit of Auto-Tune to fine tune the vocals.

− For example, sections where the singer has been slightly out of tune may not have been noticeable in the original, but can stand out more over a different beat. Tempo’s obviously also important. If the tempo of the vocal needs to be changed too much, it won’t work, he writes and gives an example:

− I recently tried a well known Motown vocal over the Usher/Lil Jon Lovers & Friends instrumental. In terms of feel and key, the vocal worked great, but because the beat is so slow and for longer phrases the song sounded ridiculous being slowed down so much, so I dropped the idea. It’s a shame because I could hear that it would have been a sweet slow jam.

Hassle with clearances
Al Fingers writes that he hasn’t got many comments from the artists he has mashed and doubts that the artists have actually heard them.

Mark Ronson liked the Bob Marley No woman No Cry remix I did over his Love Is A Losing Game beat and I’m trying to get the Kings Of Leon to listen to a mash-up I’ve done with one of their acapellas with a view to putting it out, but it’s difficult, he writes and continues:

− I’ve approached a few labels to suggest that they release some of the remixes I’ve done. But generally they seem to see it as too complicated with all the clearances, and aren’t that interested. It’s a shame because there are some great mash-ups out there that don’t really get heard because they don’t get the exposure.

He mentions some mash-ups that have had proper releases, for instance Mark Vidler with Blondie & The Doors and the Mashed album for EMI, and Gloria Estefan over Mylo’s Drop The Pressure. However, he thinks they are too few and far between and reveals a dream.

− Recently I was lucky to be able to produce some legit Greensleeves mash-ups, using Junjo Lawes’ instrumentals. Ideally I’d like to be approached by a label like Motown, and pair them with another label like Studio 1. That would make for a wicked mash-up album! You just need someone at the label to have the vision and belief in that kind of project.

Curious about how Al Fingers productions sound? Check out his web site or download a mash-up of Cher’s Believe and the Declaration of Rights rhythm.

 Believe (Declaration Remix). (Right click, save as).

————————————–
This was the third and last part of Reggaemani’s interview series on mash-ups. The previous two was with Bost & Bim and Max Tannone.

1 Comment

Filed under Interviews

Bost & Bim thirst for a cappellas

Bost & Bim is a French production duo that makes mashups based on self-produced rhythms. They’ve produced a series of mashup mixtapes under the name Yankees A Yard, and in June they released the third edition.

Matthieu Bost, one half of the duo, writes in an e-mail to Reggaemani that the most important thing is that the songs used for the mashup are in tune.

− It may seem obvious, but it’s not always the case. Also important is that the new tune changes the mood of the song. The more the better. We prefer to hear Eminem on Benny Hill music rather than on another hip-hop instrumental. Or a minor tune turned into a major.

Matthieu thinks that reggae is particularly good for mashing with other genres because it often changes the perception of the song. It makes you hear it in a new and different way.

Can’t see the woods for all the trees
The Bost & Bim mashups have made reggae fans interested in singers from other genres. He brings up a familiar example.

− For example, a lot of reggae fans have asked us “who is Usher? This singer is wicked!”. They’ve surely heard him a lot, but never realized that his songs are good because of the music, writes Matthieu.

He also writes that a lot of people have told the duo that they don’t like reggae, but like their mixtapes.

What a mashup producer needs
The main ingredients on the three volumes of Yankees A Yard are reggae rhythms combined with hip-hop and RnB voice tracks. However, the duo has also tried their hand on artists such as Daft Punk, Femi Kuti and The Beatles. Matthieu explains why they’ve chosen these genres.

− First of all because we like the music, especially hip-hop. Secondly, because in hip-hop and RnB it’s tradition to put the vocals on vinyl and, nowadays, also in the mp3 package. This is not the case in other genres. For the same reasons, we are very glad when we find a cappellas from other genres.

And if there’s something that a mashup producer needs, one thing is clearly more important than others.

− A cappellas!!!!

———————————————
This is the first part of Reggaemani’s series on mashups. Next up is an interview with NYC-based dj and producer Max Tannone.

4 Comments

Filed under Interviews

Interview series on mashups

There has been several massive mashups lately. Therefore Reggaemani will start a interview series on this phenomenon.

Starting the series is French duo Bost & Bim aka The Bombist crew, who are responsible for the Yankees A Yard series.

Then we move over the Atlantic and focus on Max Tannone, dj and producer of several great mashups. He recently released the huge album Mos Dub.

The series ends with Al Fingers – a musician, producer and dj from London. He has done some really interesting mashups, for example Cher over the classic Declaration of Rights riddim.

Stay tuned.

5 Comments

Filed under News

Genreöverskridande duo ser inga gränser

Det är bråda dagar för franska producentduon Bost & Bim. The Bombist Crew, som Matthieu Bost och Jérémie “Bim” Dessus också kallar sig, har nyligen släppt sin Soprano-riddim och planerar att åka på dj-turné under hösten. Samtidigt har de väckt stor uppmärksamhet under friidrotts-VM i Tyskland där deras Jamaican Boy spelats när sprintstjärnan Usain Bolt vunnit sina många lopp.
Men det Bost & Bim är kanske mest kända för är deras remixar, där duon struntar i alla musikaliska gränser. På remixplattorna Yankees A Yard vol. 1 & 2 är grundstommen – eller rytmen – hela tiden reggae, men där tar det också stopp. För resten kan komma från genrer som hip-hop, soul, r&b, rock eller till och med house.
¬¬- Den ursprungliga idéen var att bygga riddims utifrån hip-hop låtar vi älskar. En dag tyckte vi att de skulle vara kul att prova att mixa in originalsången från låtarna, och det fungerade så bra att vi bara fortsatte med ännu fler riddims och acapellas, säger Bost.
Trots att duons remixar är genreöverskridande så betonar båda att det är reggae de sysslar med, även om de gärna inspireras av många andra musikstilar.
– Vi försöker alltid bevara en tydlig reggaeidentitet i våra låtar och remixar. Det vi gör måste få höfter att svänga och magar att vibrera, menar Bim.
Bost & Bims remixar har fått stor uppmärksamhet bland såväl hårdhudande reggaefantaster som den mainstreamlyssnande allmänheten. Men vissa reggaepurister tycker att remixarna är ute på väl djupt vatten.
– Vissa har sagt att vi gör fel när vi mixar reggae med amerikanska låtar, men den kritiken ger vi inte mycket för. De glömmer ju att många älskade reggaeartister har spelat in covers på amerikansk soul. Ta bara Dennis Brown, Sanchez eller John Holt. Dessutom finns det ju inga regler i musik, och vi försöker hela tiden att vara så nära de så kallade gränserna som möjligt.
Oavsett kritiken, så tycks remixarna gå hem på såväl klubbar som hos reggaefans och i de icke-reggaelyssnande stugorna.
– Många dj:s uppskattar vårt material eftersom de kan använda det till att förena flera olika genrer på dansgolvet. På ett sätt kan man säga att vi använder en trojansk häst-strategi för att få ut reggaen ännu bredare. Men det fungerar åt bägge håll, säger Bost och tar ett exempel.
– Vi har mött hårdnackade reggaefans som kommit fram till oss och undrat ”Vem är den där underbare sångaren Usher?”.
Och framgångarna med remixarna ser ut att fortsätta. Remixen mellan Police/Mavado har exempelvis legat högt på flera olika försäljningslistor i både Europa och Japan. Härnäst kan vi se fram emot låtar av Flo Rida tillsammans Kesha och Rick James discohit Superfreak. Båda i klassiskt reggaetempo. Naturligtvis.

Bost & BimDet är bråda dagar för franska producentduon Bost & Bim. The Bombist Crew, som Matthieu Bost och Jérémie “Bim” Dessus också kallar sig, har nyligen släppt sin Soprano-riddim och planerar att åka på dj-turné under hösten. Samtidigt har de väckt stor uppmärksamhet under friidrotts-VM i Tyskland där deras Jamaican Boy spelats när sprintstjärnan Usain Bolt vunnit sina många lopp.

Men det Bost & Bim är kanske mest kända för är deras remixar, där duon struntar i alla musikaliska gränser. På remixplattorna Yankees A Yard vol. 1 & 2 är grundstommen – eller rytmen – hela tiden reggae, men där tar det också stopp. För resten kan komma från genrer som hip-hop, soul, r&b, rock eller till och med house.

– Den ursprungliga idéen var att bygga riddims utifrån hip-hop låtar vi älskar. En dag tyckte vi att de skulle vara kul att prova att mixa in originalsången från låtarna, och det fungerade så bra att vi bara fortsatte med ännu fler riddims och acapellas, säger Bost.

Trots att duons remixar är genreöverskridande betonar båda att det är reggae de sysslar med, även om de gärna inspireras av många andra musikstilar.

– Vi försöker alltid bevara en tydlig reggaeidentitet i våra låtar och remixar. Det vi gör måste få höfter att svänga och magar att vibrera, menar Bim.

Remixarna har fått stor uppmärksamhet bland såväl hårdhudandeyankees_a_yard_2 reggaefantaster som den mainstreamlyssnande allmänheten. Men vissa reggaepurister tycker att de är ute på väl djupt vatten.

– Vissa har sagt att vi gör fel när vi mixar reggae med amerikanska låtar, men den kritiken ger vi inte mycket för. De glömmer ju att många älskade reggaeartister spelat in covers på amerikansk soul. Ta bara Dennis Brown, Sanchez eller John Holt. Dessutom finns det ju inga regler i musik, och vi försöker hela tiden att vara så nära de så kallade gränserna som möjligt.

Oavsett kritiken, så tycks remixarna gå hem på såväl klubbar som hos reggaefans och i de icke-reggaelyssnande stugorna.

– Många djs uppskattar vårt material eftersom de kan använda det till att förena flera olika genrer på dansgolvet. På ett sätt kan man säga att vi använder en trojansk häst-strategi för att få ut reggaen ännu bredare. Men det fungerar åt bägge håll, säger Bost och tar ett exempel.

– Vi har mött hårdnackade reggaefans som kommit fram till oss och undrat ”Vem är den där underbare sångaren Usher?”.

Och framgångarna med remixarna ser ut att fortsätta. Remixen mellan Police/Mavado har exempelvis legat högt på flera olika försäljningslistor i både Europa och Japan. Härnäst kan vi se fram emot låtar av Flo Rida tillsammans Kesha och Rick James discohit Superfreak. Båda i klassiskt reggaetempo. Naturligtvis.

7 Comments

Filed under Intervjuer

Reggaemixarna du inte kan leva utan

Ibland när jag ska hitta en perfekt platta att lyssna på, så känns plötsligt skivsamlingen oerhört innehållslös och tråkig. Säkert handlar det mer om att jag är oinspirerad, än om att jag saknar musik att lyssna på.

Vid de här återkommande tillfällena kan jag glädja mig åt att det finns ett antal som redan gjort jobbet åt mig. Det handlar om de dj:s som regelbundet lägger ut mixar och podcasts på webben eller säljer dem via exempelvis  iTunes eller eMusic.

Oavsett om du är professionell dj eller inte så kan du i dag hitta publiken via nätet. Det handlar om kärlek till musiken snarare än om att ha koll på taktmixar och bpm.

Nu råkar det dock finnas ett antal professionella dj:s som jag tycker är väl värda att hålla ett extra öga på.

B&BBost & Bim
Bost & Bim är en fransk producentduo som under senare tid gjort stordåd med egenproducerande riddims. Jag tänker främst på makalösa Soprano riddim, som har spelats in av bland annat Queen Omega och Admiral T. Utöver det egenproducerande materialet gör de även egna mixar i en helt egen nisch. Det handlar om reggaemixar av soul och hip-hop, både gammal som ny. Vad sägs om Usher & Ludacris Yeah, John Legends Ordinary People eller Jackon Fives klassiska I want you back i reggaeversioner? Kan inte nog rekommendera dig att lyssna på mixarna Yankees A Yard volym I och II.

DJ_Andy_Smith_Greensleeves_Document_Greensleeves_RecordsAndy Smith
Engelske dj:n Andy Smith har varit i gång i flera år. Han är en regelbundet återkommande radio-dj och gör även egna mixar. Ett av hans senaste alster är The Greensleeves Document, där han mixar klassiska dancehall-kompositioner. Han har även gjort en liknade insats för Trojan Records. Den gången med fokus på tidig reggae.

Utöver reggae har han gjort northern soul mixar samt mixar som är en tokig blandning av funk, rock, reggae och hip-hop. Black Sabbath, Showbiz & A.G, Dandy och Joe Tex lyckas Andy Smith att rymma under samma tak. En skruvad och kul blandning med andra ord.

KentaroKentaro
Kentaro är från Japan och otroligt populär i hemlandet, men spelar även på klubbar jorden runt. Han spelar huvudsakligen hip-hop men har gjort en unik reggaemix för skivbolaget Pressure Sounds. Skivan släpptes förra året och är en blytung mix av tidig roots, dub och dancehall. Den extra basen i mixen gör att låtar som Roots Kunta Kinte med Joe Gibbs & The Professionals och Diverse doctrine med The Village Bunch aldrig låtit bättre.

Utöver de tre jag nämnt ovan har bland annat Trojan Records gett ut ett antal andra mixar av varierande kvalitet. Även Chinese Assassin gör regelbundet mixar med huvudsakligen modern one drop och dancehall.

1 Comment

Filed under Krönikor