Tag Archives: Genis Trani

Sr. Wilson stands steady on Paso Firme

Sr.-Wilson-Paso-firme-43204_frontFollowing last year’s excellent mixtape Back to Rub a Dub, versatile singjay Sr. Wilson and talented producer Genis Trani have once again collaborated with great effect.

On the twelve track Paso Firme Sr. Wilson shows his full range as an artist and he sounds comfortable with anything that Genis Trani provides him him. He can sing and he can deejay. He sounds like I Roy, Shabba Ranks and Yellowman. Not at the same time though.

Genis Trani has provided him with solid riddims, ranging from superbly executed rub a dub over on ¿Quién Viene? via slick lovers rock El Instante to booming hip-hop on El Muro. Sr. Wilson and Genis Trani can also do pop and contemporary dancehall as showcased on the uplifting Feel Good and the melancholic My Teachers.

Judging by the arty album cover this set might be confused by an album from an indie rock band like Weezer. But never judge an apple by looking at the tree and don’t judge no honey by looking at the bee, as Freddie McGregor once sang. Paso Firme is personal and fresh reggae well-above average.

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Sr Wilson and Genis Trani on a rub a dub adventure

FRONTIt’s hard to keep up with album releases and when reading best of 2014 lists I have found a few gems. One of those is Back to Rub a Dub by singjay Sr. Wilson and producer Genis Trani. The album was selected by one of the best from last year by House of Reggae and that site also awarded Sr. Wilson the title artist of the year.

Sr. Wilson and Genis Trani are both from Barcelona. Genis Trani has previously produced and written a number of strong albums, for example Jahmali’s excellent We I Open from last year.

Sr. Wilson carries an old school flow and is heavily inspired by singers from the early 80s dancehall era and together with Genis Trani he has on Back to Rub a Dub embarked on an journey back to a time when Henry “Junjo” Lawes and Prince Jammy ruled the dancehalls and when Roots Radics pushed forward their taking no prisoners kind of riddims over at Channel One.

This 16 track album, or maybe mixtape is more accurate, is built on well-known and much versioned riddims. Sr. Wilson sings and deejays like he was Don Carlos, Sammy Dread or Barry Brown and Genis Trani has produced it with style and fashion.

Mixtapes like this has been done before, but this one superbly executed from start to finish. It’s currently available for free download over at Eternal Miusik. Check it here.

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Finally a new album from Jahmali

artworks-000080724959-uar2os-cropIt took 13 years for the massively under-recorded Jamaican singer Jahmali to drop his second album, third if you count the Treasure Box compilation. Responsible for the new album We I Open is Catalan label Reggaeland.

He started his career in the 90s and voiced a number of hit songs for Donovan Germain, Bobby “Digital” Dixon and Barry O’Hare. He is to date probably best known for songs such as Let Me Live and El Shaddai as well as the Buju Banton combination Mother’s Cry.

Since the 90s he has kept a low profile, but made a minor come back a few years ago when he dropped Blood Thirsty on UK’s Necessary Mayhem Records.

We I Open was recorded in Jamaica, Spain and California and includes twelve tracks produced by Marcus Reggaeland and written by his companion Genis “Genious” Trani along with lyrics from Jahmali.

“We I Open is a gift to the world and a personal contribution towards part of one of the only possible solutions in this spiritual struggle,” says Jahmali in a press release.

We I Open drops on June 1st.

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