Tag Archives: Reggae Euphoria

Mr. Vegas shows his full range on Reggae Euphoria

unnamedDancehall superstar Mr. Vegas’ new album Reggae Euphoria is an eclectic and unusual – or dare I say odd – story. This 15 track set showcases all sides of the dynamic Mr. Vegas across a variety of genres, including rootsy reggae, energetic dancehall, smooth R&B and uplifting gospel.

It bounces off with the acoustic and nyabinghi-flavoured Mr. Shotta, followed by God Good, on a clever remake of the mighty Answer riddim. It has a bright and catchy church chorus where Mr. Vegas asks “If you know the lord is keeping you, what are you worrying about, if you know the lord is keeping, you why don’t you sing and shout.”

Fast forward to The Climb, a version of Miley Cyrus’ hit on which Mr. Vegas sings over a thumping riddim that sounds like it was recorded by New Jack Swingster Teddy Riley in Jamaica in the early 90s.

Mr. Vegas also covers Leonard Cohen’s Hallelujah and Alton Ellis’ I’ve Got a Date. In between he has time for the ska-tinged My Jam and the romantic Thank You Girl. The set closes with Mr. Vegas’ take on the Nah Fraid riddim, a sparse riddim rooted in the mid-80s digital dancehall craze.

Reggae Euphoria blends romance and culture and at times finds the singer in a silky and sultry mood.

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Mr. Vegas catches the reggae euphoria

unnamedTalented dancehall deejay and label owner Mr. Vegas has been productive in recent years. In 2012 he dropped the acclaimed reggae-fused double disc Sweet Jamaica and last year he released the more dancehall-oriented Bruk it Down 2.0.

Now it’s time for a new album. His sixth to date. It’s called Reggae Euphoria and hits the streets on September 23.

Mr. Vegas has been in the music business for nearly 20 years and is best known for his energetic dancehall hits, but Reggae Euphoria is in a press release said to highlight a different style, just as the aforementioned Sweet Jamaica did when it came out.

The upcoming set collects 15 tracks and is expected to include a broad mix of genres. The greater portion is said to be reggae, but Mr. Vegas also ventures into dancehall, hip-hop, R&B, comedy (!) and gospel. It certainly sounds like another Sweet Jamaica.

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