Tag Archives: Rocksteady

Dancing down Orange Street

DANCING-DOWN-ORANGE-STREETCherry Red Records has via its new imprint Doctor Bird issued a scorching rarity with no less than 13 bonus cuts. The album is the compilation Dancing Down Orange Street, produced by Sonia Pottinger and originally put out in 1969.

A compilation like this helped to put the B in boss reggae and it comes with a truckload of skanking tracks, including Ken Boothe’s pulsating Live Good and Delano Stewart’s classic That’s Life.

This is the first ever reissue of this highly collectible album. A bit odd since it features both prominent singers and hit songs of the time. The original fetches prices that would empty many pockets. But no need saving up for one of those now.

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The Treasure Isle Story shines new light on the legendary label

61IkZdJpG+LFinally Trojan Records returns with another hefty and well-compiled compilation. The Treasure Isle Story comes with four discs and a whopping 115 tracks, of which 29 (!) are new to CD, including unreleased versions and alternate cuts.

Duke Reid and his label Treasure Isle have been compiled many, many times over the years, but this compilation is the first comprehensive anthology and includes a deep look at reggae – from mento and ska to reggae and of course rocksteady; this is what made Treasure Isle famous. Duke Reid certainly had a keen ear for melody.

The hits here are way too many to mention, but standout cuts include Justin Hinds & The Dominoes’ raw Carry Go Bring Home, The Techniques’ beautiful You Don’t Care and Jaya Landis’ pulsating Moonlight Lover.

Gems from the deeper side of the vaults include The Silvertones’ lively Don’t Run For A Hiding Place and Pat Kelly’s a cappella version of the gorgeous I Wish It Would Rain.

This album is well-balanced and comes at a bargain price. Essential to any music collection.

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Keith & Tex recreate the sounds of the 60s on new album

unnamedJamaican harmony duo Keith & Tex – probably best known for their smash hit Stop That Train – has just released their new album Same Old Story, an eleven-track set recorded together with ace producer Roberto Sánchez, who is a master in recreating vintage sounds.

Same Old Story is maybe a telling title since the music is classic rocksteady; a genre that made Keith & Tex stars in Jamaica and abroad in the late 60s. The album collects only original material and could very well have been recorded and issued back in the days.

The harmonies are tight and many of the cuts have a melancholic feel to them. And the duo covers themes from broken hearts to the refugee crisis in Syria.

Once again Roberto Sánchez shows that he can create hit sounds for any (veteran) reggae artist. This is music for music lovers.

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Classics and obscurities on Studio One Rocksteady 2

unnamedWith a sturdy 19 tracks there’s not a dull moment on Soul Jazz’ second installment of Studio One Rocksteady, although some of the tracks have previously been featured on countless of other albums. I’m talking about well-known songs like Alton Ellis’ I’m Still In Love With You, Slim Smit’s Born To Love and The Heptones’ I Shall Be Released.

The title is however slightly misleading since the album draws both Studio One’s deep rocksteady and early reggae vaults. And it offers a sweet mix of staples and obscure singles. Best of the bunch is The Termites’ pulsating Rub Up Push Up, Carlton & The Shoes’ melancholic Never Let Go, Cannon & The Soul Vendors’ bouncy instrumental Bad Treatment and The Actions’ up-tempo Giddy Up.

Studio One Rocksteady 2 includes a number of cuts that helped to shape reggae to an international phenomenon.

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Stunning instrumentals on ABC Rocksteady

a0416938415_16In December Japan’s Dub Store Records put out another scarce rocksteady gem. ABC Rocksteady was originally released in 1968 in Jamaica and the UK with different sleeves. This reissues comes with the Jamaican and slightly more colorful sleeve.

The set includes instrumental versions of some of producer Sonia Pottinger’s greatest rocksteady cuts and all features ex-Skatalite and saxophone maestro Roland Alphonso as arranger and musician.

Hip Hug Her is a slice of funky rocksteady while Wild and Free is almost like a big swing band playing. The flute on Narata adds brightness and the tracks like That’s Life and Sad Song feature killer organ work.

A must-have set for anyone interested in great music.

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Sweet harmonizing on new rocksteady compilation

various-artists-merritone-rock-steady-2-this-music-got-soul-1966-1967From Japan’s eminent Dub Store Records comes another epic rocksteady compilation and yet again it shines light on Jamaica’s Federal Records and producer Ken Khouri.

Merritone Rock Steady 2: This Music Got Soul 1966-1967 collects a hefty 21 cuts including novelties such as The Federal All Stars’ Merritone False Starts 2 and a rehearsal version of Lynn Taitt & The Jets’ version of the Batman theme.

But the real gems on this superb and sweet set are the vocal groups and their beautiful, yet sometimes a little rough around the edges, three-part harmonizing. Check for example The Tartans’ catchy Rolling Rolling, with its intense keys, or The Zodiacs’ Walk On By, with its lingering guitar and strong chorus.

60 minutes of early rocksteady. It’s the birth of reggae music.

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Meaty rocksteady compilation spotlights Federal Records

unnamedFollowing two epic rocksteady compilations showcasing Derrick Harriott comes a set spotlighting a somewhat lesser known producer – Ken Khouri and his Federal Records.

Ken Khouri was a talented entrepreneur and started in the music business in the mid-50s. He opened the first record manufacturing plant in Jamaica and his studio helped to create ska, rocksteady and reggae.

Ken Khouri is not as well-known as some of his peers – including Coxsone Dodd and Duke Reid – but his output was superb as showcased on Merritone Rock Steady 1: Shanty Town Curfew 1966-1967, a set collecting a hefty 21 tracks ranging from frenzied ska to the softer rocksteady.

It features a selection of vocal cuts and instrumentals and some are probably well-known, but most are – at least to this writer – new. And as usual with Japan’s Dub Store Records the audio quality is superb and most of the tracks are sourced from their master tape.

Highlights include two scorching cuts from The Tartans – Dance All Night and What Can I Do. The tracks are quite similar with a frenetic piano setting the tone. When this quartet split up three of the singers – Prince Lincoln Thompson, Cedric Myton and Devon Russell – would pursue international careers as both solo artists and as part of The Royal Rasses and The Congos.

The extensive liner notes feature extracts from extensive interviews with Paul Khouri whose knowledgeable recollections of working with Federal Records, not only as a producer but as an engineer and musician, are enlightening and educational.

The second volume of this superb compilation is released on October 28.

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Intoxicating rocksteady on Lynn Taitt’s greatest hits

lynn-taitt-the-jets-rock-steady-greatest-hitsLegendary Trinibagoan guitar ace Lynn Taitt is one of the key architects in rocksteady and reggae and played on countless of sessions in the 60s and 70s. And he also has a number of tunes and albums credited to himself.

One of those is the rare and recently reissued Greatest Hits, originally issued in 1968 on the Merritone label. On this beautiful set he has arranged instrumental versions of rocksteady classics, cuts which he graces with his tuneful guitar playing.

But this set offers more than just magnificent guitar licks. Several tunes also come with spectacular horn blasts and horn solos.

This is the swinging and hip-shaking sounds of the 60s.

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Painfully sweet rocksteady on The Frightnrs debut

dap-042-lp_f-low-res2New York quartet The Frightnrs – nowadays a trio since singer Dan Klein tragically died on June 9, 2016, from A.L.S. – celebrates the soul of rocksteady on their debut album Nothing More To Say, a set following their dark EP Inna Lovers Quarrell, which was released via Diplo’s label Mad Decent last year.

Nothing More To Say was recorded last year, prior to Dan Klein’s A.L.S. diagnosis. Dan Klein sings about aching love and lost relationships, and these themes now gain second meanings, making reference to a lost life, a life that was too soon.

Dan Klein’s pleading, vulnerable voice – sometimes singing with a captivating falsetto – suits the melancholic melodies and raw and stripped down rhythms very well. He and his three bandmates treat rocksteady with respect, care and devotion and together with producer Victor “Ticklah” Axelrod they bring vintage sounds to a new generation.

This is the first reggae album released on Daptone Records, home to Sharon Jones and several soul bands and singers. And hopefully more releases like this will come.

But for now, I have nothing more to say than just get this charming and mesmerizing album. It’s painful and sweet at the same time. Just like rocksteady should be.

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Elegant and melancholic rocksteady from Derrick Harriott’s vaults

unnamedAfter reissuing the epic Derrick Harriott’s Rocksteady Party Japan’s Dub Store Records returns with a compilation collecting both stone-cold classics and rare collector’s items from Derrick Harriott’s vaults.

Derrick Harriott Rocksteady 1966-1969 showcases masterpieces such as Derrick Harriott’s own Do I Worry, Keith & Tex’ Stop That Train and Tonight alongside beautiful instrumentals like Ike Bennett & The Crystalites’ Illya Kuryankin and Bobby Ellis’ Step Softly. The selection also features three obscure cuts from Junior Soul, who would later score a hit with Police & Thieves as Junior Murvin.

Derrick Harriott is one of the forerunners in Jamaican music and started his career as a singer in the late 50s and would soon find fame as part of the Jiving Juniors. Later he turned to production and his recordings have always been crisp and elegant.

This stellar compilation collects timeless, melodious and stylish rocksteady produced by one of Jamaica’s many musical giants.

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