Tag Archives: The Journey

The Emeterians’ reggae journey

TheJourneyThe Emeterians – a vocal trio from Spain – has put out a beautiful new album. Vocal trios are unusual these days, but were very popular in the 60s and 70s when The Uniques, The Techniques, The Heptones and The Wailers ruled the dances. However, even in those days you hardly came across a trio consisting of both male and female vocalists.

This is the case with The Emeterians. They have three lead singers – two male and one female. And it’s an excellent set-up adding plenty of depth to the songs.

The Emeterians started more than ten years ago and in 2012 they decided to relocate to London, the European reggae capital. There they formed collaborations with Peckings and Stingray. And the alliance with Peckings has proved fruitful, since Chris Peckings has together with Cosme Deyah produced The Journey, which offers a variety of styles, including rocksteady, roots and lovers rock.

The 13 songs are recorded over vintage riddims from Peckings’ deep vaults as well as newly recorded ones, including a solid cover of The Abyssinians Y Mas Gaan, a version that puts much attention to the original version.

It’s a marvelous set showcasing the versatility and breath of both The Emeterians and reggae.

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A journey with a few detours

I’m a big fan of singjay Omar Perry. His first two albums Man Free and Can’t Stop Us Now got a lot of spins in my home and on my way to work. His efforts on riddims such as Soprano and Gorilla have also been pleasant acquaintances.

On his third album The Journey Omar Perry has teamed up with a variety of producers from around the world, including Lockdown, Bost & Bim, Tune In Crew, Itation Records, Danny Champagne, Watch Out Production, Wake Up, Mad Professor, Mafia & Fluxy and Ruff Cut. Plus a host of others.

As you can guess this many producers makes for a non-cohesive whole. The Journey collects 18 tracks put together in one set without a clear story behind it. However, this makes something of a classic Jamaican album with singles from different producers thrown together.

Even though it lacks cohesiveness there are several highlights, and unfortunately a few train wrecks.

Be sure to check Bost & Bims’ relick of The Gatherer’s eerie Words of My Mouth, I&I Raising over a bass heavy relick of the Declaration of Rights riddim, the hip-hop infused Ready for the World with its tough harmonies or Thinking of You with Earl 16, a tune with a beat reminiscent of the Diwali riddim.

The shaky part of this journey is when Omar Perry wants to make contemporary RnB and experiments with the criminally overused auto-tune effect. A tune such as World Let Us Down would have been enjoyable without Omar Perry sounding like a cartoon character. Same goes for the electronic She is So Nice featuring vocalist and producer Fabrice Boyer.

The Journey is no straight road and includes several detours and it would have gained from being more cohesive and with fewer songs.

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